2017

BIG SOCIETY

ROSETTA

SILENT RUNNINGS

BURGOS

LE CAPITAL

TRASH DANCE

STILL THE ENEMY WITHIN

KINKY BOOTS

MONSIEUR VERDOUX

WOMEN’S DAY

BURN

ROSETTA

Dir: Luc Dardenne, Jean-Pierre Dardenne – 1999

A deserving winner of the Palme D’or at Cannes in 1999, Rosetta was written and directed by the Belgian film-making team of brothers, Luc and Jean Pierre Dardenne. It is an uncompromising tale of poverty, closely following the life of a young woman struggling to shake free of her dead-end background. Living on a Belgian caravan site with her alcoholic mother, Rosetta burns with a desire for the things most of us take for granted – a regular job and a regular life. This is a truly moving and commanding classic that justifiably earned its lead, Émilie Dequenne, the best actress prize at Cannes

BURGOS

Dir: Joel Langaman – 2013

Burgos is a film about Mrs Edita Burgos and the search for her missing son, Jonas Burgos. Jonas was a farm worker and agriculturist and a member of the Farmers Alliance of Bulacan. In April 2007 seven armed men and a woman abducted him from a restaurant in Ever Gotesco Mall, Quezon City, Philippines. Seven years later, Mrs Edita Burgos’s tireless crusade to search for her son still goes on. She is supported by the human rights groups ‘Desaparecidos’ (Families of the Disappeared), which has pursued the case that directly links the Philippine military to Jona’s abduction and detention. They repeatedly deny their involvement. Jonas Burgos and hundreds of progressive political activists, journalists, trade union activists and outspoken clergy have been killed or abducted in the Philippines during the past decade by suspected members and affiliates of the military and other state forces. Under the auspices of the counter-insurgency program ‘Oplan Bayanihan’ the military have committed gross human rights violations with impunity against those who are critical of the government. The Campaign for Human Rights in the Philippines UK (CHRP-UK), in co-operation with the London Labour Film Festival, is proud to screen the European Film Premiere of Burgos. Proceeds from the event will go to human rights groups campaigning for justice in the Philippines. Burgos is written by Ricardo Lee and directed by Joel C Lamangan, award winning Filipino screenwriter/director. Ms Lorna Tolentino, award-winning Filipina actress stars as Mrs Burgos.

Written and directed by two of the Philippine cinemas leading lights, Ricardo Lee and Joel C Lamangan, Burgos is a film about a mothers desperate search for her missing son. In April 2007 Jonas Burgos, an agriculturist and a member of the Farmers Alliance of Bulacan, was abducted by seven armed men and a woman at a restaurant in Ever Gotesco Mall, Quezon City, Philippines. Seven years later, Mrs Edita Burgos’s tireless crusade to search for her son still goes on. The human rights group, Desaparecidos (Families of the Disappeared), supports her. They have found direct links to the abduction and detention with the Phillippine military, though they deny it repeatedly. The Campaign for Human Rights in the Philippines UK (CHRP-UK), in co-operation with the London Labour Film Festival, is proud to screen Burgos at the London Film Festival.

TRASH DANCE

Dir: Andrew Garrison – 2012

“It is an honor and a delight to have Trash Dance screening as a part of the London Labour Film Festival. There is no more appropriate venue. While I hope this film is a pleasure for the audience, it is about serious stuff: our attitude about labour and the people who get it done. We are muscle and bone and made to move and work. Choreographer Allison Orr might say, “to dance,” because she remembers that it is all time, space, and energy. This film is about the labour of usually-overlooked, working-class, men and women, and about the labour of a choreographer. If I have done my job right (my labour), you may also reflect on your own work and your relationship to your work. Most of my small body of work has been about working people whose voices are seldom truly heard in popular media. Children making photographs of their rural lives, single mothers, coalminers, inner-city AfricanAmericans, even the work that goes on to make a small, travelling circus. I like people who know how to work. I come from a loud, cantankerous, working-class family. I was shaped by stories from parents, grandparents, and aunts and uncles, of funny encounters, wonders, fights, failures, justice, victories, and dreams. I am drawn to people and stories of people who work to make something better – themselves, a way in the world, a place for others, a thing of beauty. Sometimes these ideas seem to me to be from another generation, another era, larger than life. When the stories and the people seem larger than life, it is probably because I have allowed my vision of life to become cramped. Life is big and messy. There are fights going on now in the U.S. over the rights of public and private employees. It looks like the gains won in the previous century will be greatly diminished in the next decade. There is a growing level of demagoguery that protects its own interests, chooses enemies, and assigns blame only to others. So pensions become the problem with the city of Detroit, teachers’ unions are crippling the state of Wisconsin and sanitation workers are underworked and overpaid. This is much easier to pull off if you don’t know who is doing the work. It is especially easy if you have come to believe that people are the same as their jobs. I have stopped being surprised when someone tells me they assumed that if you pick up garbage you were not capable of much else. What I hope is that this light, little, film has deep roots. A maxim of documentary production is, “make what you’d want to watch.” I enjoy big-hearted stories that don’t take themselves too seriously. I like stories that feed me but don’t leave a bad, medicine-taste in my mouth. I like meeting people and feeling like we’ve gotten below the surfaces.” – Andrew Garrison

Trash Dance is a film that finds beauty and grace in a completely unexpected place – garbage trucks and in the unseen men and women who pick up our trash. American filmmaker, Andrew Garrison follows choreographer Allison Orr as she rides along with Austin sanitation workers on their daily routes to observe and later convince them to perform a most unlikely spectacle. On an abandoned airport runway, two dozen trash collectors and their trucks deliver — for one night only — a stunningly beautiful and moving performance, in front of an audience of thousands, who are awed to discover how in the world a garbage truck can “dance.”

STILL THE ENEMY WITHIN

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BURN

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SILENT RUNNINGS

Dir: Douglas Trumbull – 1972

This 1970’s environmentally themed sci-fi classic had an enormous influence on the whole Sci-Fi genre and so is of significant importance. Set in the future when plant life on earth has become extinct. Only a few specimens have been preserved in enormous, greenhouse-like domes attached to a fleet of space freighters, outside the orbit of Saturn. Freeman Lowell (the recently Oscar nominated Bruce Dern) is one of four crewmen aboard the Valley Forge and is the resident botanist and ecologist who carefully preserves a variety of plants for their eventual return to Earth. Lowell lovingly cultivates the crops and attends to the animal life After he’s given the order to jettison his beloved crops, Freeman Lowell goes rogue in a bid to protect the flora. As one of the first true eco-warriors, Lowell takes matters into his own hands and the action really begins…

BIG SOCIETY

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LE CAPITAL

Dir: Costa-Gavras – 2012

The financial thriller, Le Capital by the Greek-French film director Costa Gavras takes an unflinching look at the world of greed and high finance. It follows the story of an executive Marc Tourneuil (Gad Elmaleh) who becomes the CEO of a large bank, only to upset the bank’s board of directors when he begins to take unilateral control of the bank. We witness his ruthless ambition, power struggles, greed and deception. However, his brutal ascent is jeopardized by a hostile takeover attempt from a large American hedge fund led by Dittmar Rigule (Gabriel Byrne). Le Capital is fast-paced, darkly comic and a suspenseful drama well worth the many accolades it has received.

Dir: Julian Jarrold – 2005

Kinky Boots tells the story of a traditional Northampton shoemaker who’s family business is in trouble. After a chance meeting he sees a business opportunity by diversifying into the market of fetish shoes (or Kinky Boots) – an opportunity that could save his family business and the jobs of his workers. The award-winning actor, Chiwetel Ejifor, plays the drag queen, Lola, who advises and helps the shoemaker Charlie (Joel Edgerton) in his new venture. Based on a true story, this is a riotous comedy and a truly heart-warming tale.

Dir: Maria Sadowska – 2012

Described by many as a Polish ‘Erin Brockovich’, Women’s Day follows the troubles and dilemmas of the heroine, Halina Radwan (Katarzyna Kwiatkowska) in her fight for justice against an unscrupulous, low-cost supermarket-chain, ‘Motylek’ (Butterfly) The plot is based on the true story of a former manageress of a cutprice supermarket chain in Poland. She took the chain to court for twenty-six thousand złoty (over five thousand euro) for two-and-a-half thousand hours of unpaid overtime. The film is an indictment of what Poles call ‘dziki’ (wild) capitalism in which employees are compelled to work semi-legally. Such capitalism is a result of Poland’s comparative poverty by European Union standards, with minimum wages as little as (one euro) an hour, and chronic unemployment which forces workers to fight to keep almost any kind of employment.